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Please rate the book, Arin's Judgement.
5 Stars = Excellent 24%  24%  [ 4 ]
4 Stars = Good to Great 53%  53%  [ 9 ]
3 Stars = Okay 18%  18%  [ 3 ]
2 Stars = Below Average 6%  6%  [ 1 ]
1 Star = Wouldn't want to read again 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 17
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 Post Post subject: Manuscript 2: Arin's Judgement
Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:52 pm 
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Taq told me I could go ahead and start the next thread if I wanted to, so I am! \:D/

Some thoughts:
The second manuscript was interesting in that it also contained several Odyssey newspaper clippings that backed up facts in the story - just making Whit and Jack wonder even more about the truth of the stories. :yes:

I think to me it seemed like this book didn't have quite as many direct parallels, simply because the story of Noah doesn't have as many different characters and incidents to choose from. Most of the main plot with Tyran, Dr. Lyst, the elders, etc. were simply elaborating and filling out the statements of Genesis 7.
Quote:
"And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually"
"The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence. And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth."

Maybe I'm missing some parallels with that though. Anyone have any that I don't see? :-k
As the story doesn't go as long as in the Bible, we don't get to see parallels to sending out the dove etc., the rainbow, and Noah and his family emerging from the ark. I think those would have been interesting to portray. :)

I thought changing the flood to a common sickness that Marusians didn't have any resistance to was clever.

Characters:
Arin and Muiraq: Noah and his wife
Oshan and Etham: Shem and his wife
Pool and Nacob: Ham and his wife
Riv and Hesham: Japheth and his wife

Obvious parallels:

Arin's shelter = the ark
Arin's garden = Eden
The worldwide flood wiping out all life = the deadly sickness/virus wiping out all life


Anyone else have thoughts? \:D/

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Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:11 pm 




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In the Official Guide, Paul McCusker said that several of the names were chosen with a watery theme in mind. Wade, Pool, Riv, and Oshan are obvious. Thurston represents "thirsty" and Arin is an anagram of rain. I thought I remembered that Muiraq was taken from the word aquarium but I don't see that in there. :-k Also, the name Tyran is, of course, taken from tyrant.


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Posted: Mon May 04, 2009 11:49 am 
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I thought it was good, although it didn't quite grab me as much as Darien's Rise did. I don't know about anyone else, but I figured out pretty early on that the mystery plague afflicting the Marusians wasn't radiation sickness, but the flu.

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Posted: Sat May 09, 2009 2:33 pm 
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I found Arin's Judgement...disturbing. All that death and destruction, dying from the flu. Kinda like the original story, except without the water. In that sense I really liked this particular manuscript. It opened my eyes to the reality of sin and the sadness of the destruction of the world. So often we see Noah's Ark with all the cute little animals and don't think about the people who died...and WHY they died. I appreciated this book.

Personally, I liked this one better than Darien's Rise. Darien was David with 19th century clothes. But Arin really stretched the imagination to what Noah could have been like.

The names kind of drove me nuts, though. I mean Pool, Riv, and Oshan? Tyran and Thurston?

All together, I rate this book as good to great. A story from the Bible told in a completely new and eye-opening way.

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Posted: Tue May 12, 2009 10:52 pm 
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This is actually the only passages book I have sadly. :( I bought it at one of those Bible outlets for super cheap! \:D/


I really like the way they portray the story of Noah, it truly makes an old story new again. I haven't read any of the other passages books to compare this book too but overall it is great. Also, with the recent swine flu alert...it made me kind of...paranoid. ;)

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Posted: Tue May 19, 2009 3:09 pm 
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Shawndlay wrote:
I thought I remembered that Muiraq was taken from the word aquarium but I don't see that in there.

I can see how Muiraq = aquarium: There's "aq" and then "rium" backwards.

Laura Ingalls wrote:
Arin and Muiraq: Noah and his wife
Oshan and Etham: Shem and his wife
Pool and Nacob: Ham and his wife
Riv and Hesham: Japheth and his wife

Arin's Daughters-in-Law = Noah's Sons Retooled: Hesham = Shem, Nacob (anagram for bacon) = Ham, Etham = Japheth

Evil-sounding names: Tyran = tyrant, Madalay = malady, Krupt = corrupt, Liven = livid?, Greave = grieve?, Dedmon = dead? demon?, Acan = ache? Achan in the Bible?

Running Tab of 1 Blue Eye/1 Green Eye Characters: Anna, Old Judge, Sister Leona, Anastasia, Arin

Through the first two manuscripts, I'm enjoying the spiritual journeys of the kids: Kyle, Anna, and now Wade. Poor Wade went through a lot, from suffering the uncertainty of a father lost in the war to hearing the suicidal ramblings of Dr. Lyst (and eventually seeing the building blow up from afar, confirming that Dr. Lyst killed himself). I loved how Wade couldn't tell the bad guys from the good guys at the beginning and how it took him seeing Tyran blow up the innocent woman with no remorse to finally push him back to Arin. Throughout the story, I appreciated the internal conflicts of Wade, especially in regards to feeling guilty (about possessing the rudimentary atomic bomb plans, about being the vehicle by which the Unseen One delivered judgment). Since the manuscript focused on the Unseen One's judgment on the unrepentant people, I liked that the book ended on the upswing: Arin explained salvation to Wade, and Wade learned that his father is alive.

I appreciated the science included in this manuscript: Using the influenza virus, having Wade interact lots with Dr. Lyst, having the blood pressure cuff take a blood sample without any feeling, having solar power (including solar bombs) be so widespread (and having electricity be primitive), Wade's extensive knowledge of WWII weaponry.

Oh, and I found a clever shout-out to Whit's End!

Paul McCusker wrote:
"A secret tunnel," Wade observed. "I heard that Tyran's castle has one of these."
Arin replied with a slight smile, "All the best places have them."


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Posted: Wed May 20, 2009 3:06 am 




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Taq wrote:
Arin's Daughters-in-Law = Noah's Sons Retooled: Hesham = Shem, Nacob (anagram for bacon) = Ham, Etham = Japheth

Hey! I'd never noticed that! :D

Taq wrote:
Evil-sounding names: Tyran = tyrant, Madalay = malady, Krupt = corrupt, Liven = livid?, Greave = grieve?, Dedmon = dead? demon?, Acan = ache? Achan in the Bible?

I'd forgotten about all of those. I'd say Dedmon = "dead man."


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Posted: Wed May 20, 2009 9:31 am 
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Shawndlay wrote:
Taq wrote:
Arin's Daughters-in-Law = Noah's Sons Retooled: Hesham = Shem, Nacob (anagram for bacon) = Ham, Etham = Japheth

Hey! I'd never noticed that! :D

I think the bacon one is particularly hilarious. :lol:

Shawndlay wrote:
Taq wrote:
Evil-sounding names: Tyran = tyrant, Madalay = malady, Krupt = corrupt, Liven = livid?, Greave = grieve?, Dedmon = dead? demon?, Acan = ache? Achan in the Bible?

I'd forgotten about all of those. I'd say Dedmon = "dead man."

Yeah, good thought, Chandler!


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Posted: Wed May 20, 2009 1:01 pm 




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Taq wrote:
Shawndlay wrote:
Taq wrote:
Arin's Daughters-in-Law = Noah's Sons Retooled: Hesham = Shem, Nacob (anagram for bacon) = Ham, Etham = Japheth

Hey! I'd never noticed that! :D

I think the bacon one is particularly hilarious. :lol:

Makes me hungry. =P~


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Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 10:47 am 
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I had not read Passages before so decided to do so when the challenge began. I confess I had to make myself finish Darien's Rise, but was rewarded with Arin's Judgement. It was GREAT! I find the stories of how Whit and Jack discover the journals just as fascinating as the stories themselves and can't wait to see how the series ends. I just started Annison's Risk and look forward to seeing how the series unfolds.

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 Post Post subject: Re: Manuscript 2: Arin's Judgement
Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 2:46 pm 
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I like his one better then one....

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Posted: Thu Aug 06, 2009 4:08 pm 
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Arin's Judgment
by Paul McCusker

It'd been a while since I last read the second Passages book, so I was fortunate enough to go through this last reading with fairly little memory of the plot. Like Darien's Rise, it didn't take long to identify the Biblical story after which this novel was based. McCusker cleverly employs a water theme with his characters, using names such as Wade, Arin, Pool, Riv, and Oshan. The creative liberties he takes in order to come up with some of the names are somewhat laughable, maybe even bordering on cheesy, but they certainly help set the backdrop for the events that follow. Arin, a modern-day version of Noah, exemplifies the same relentless faith as his Biblical counterpart. In spite of the overwhelming opposition from all his naysayers, Arin calmly trusts in the Unseen One to fulfill his promise that all the land's inhabitants will be destroyed.

However, Wade, as a foreigner to the land, is less than convinced. Although Arin urges the young lad to stay within the safety of his compound walls, Wade misinterprets the concern of the elderly sage for merciless oppression. Feeling trapped, Wade "escapes" by climbing over the wall, unwittingly falling straight into the hands of his enemies. What strikes me most about this act of defiance is its similarity to the way mankind so commonly responds to God. We mistake his love for religious rules and regulations, not always recognizing his good and perfect intentions. God has given us parameters for living our lives not so he can flaunt his authority, but so that we might be protected from our own sinful nature.

One key aspect of the book I particular enjoyed was the way in which McCusker paralleled the flood. When I first read the book, I remember thinking that the radiation would be the cause of everyone's death. But to the author's credit, the radioactive bombs are merely red herrings for the real source of the epidemic - Wade. It's interesting how the more Wade tries to solve the crisis on his own, the further he digs himself in a hole. Even after Arin warns, "You won't stop it any more than you can stop the turning of the tide or the rising of the two moons," Wade insists on trying anyway. Isn't that how we act sometimes in our own lives during times of stress or discomfort? Maybe we trying to solve our problems without God's help, or perhaps we reacting impatiently when it doesn't seem like He is responding to our prayers. Whatever the case may be, we need to consider the possibility that the best action may be inaction on our part, and instead choosing to cast our cares and concerns upon Him (1 Peter 5:7).

In spite of all Wade's misdeeds, Arin affirms the grace given by the Unseen One. "There's no amount of suffering you can do to deserve the love of the Unseen One. He saved you because of your repentent heart - because you realized there was nothing more you could do. You had to give up and ask for His help." That last sentence sums up the entire book for me, and it simultaneously serves as a challenge for all who wish to live with Christ at the center of their lives. Are we willing to give up and surrender our lives to God?

Total Pages: 167
Maturity Rating: G
Overall Rating: Image

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Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:56 pm 
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Chandlah wrote:
Taq wrote:
Arin's Daughters-in-Law = Noah's Sons Retooled: Hesham = Shem, Nacob (anagram for bacon) = Ham, Etham = Japheth

Hey! I'd never noticed that! :D

Taq wrote:
Evil-sounding names: Tyran = tyrant, Madalay = malady, Krupt = corrupt, Liven = livid?, Greave = grieve?, Dedmon = dead? demon?, Acan = ache? Achan in the Bible?

I'd forgotten about all of those. I'd say Dedmon = "dead man."

As I was re-reading the book yesterday, I was trying to figure out the son's names, but was pulled into the story and didn't really focus on it. Good stuff, Taq! :D

I interpreted Dedmon as dead man too, like Chandler. I thought Acan was achin.' As in, pain will be coming. ;) I thought that Liven might be an ironic name. Now he's livin' but soon he'll be dyin.' I could be wrong, but I thought it was amusing. One name that I don't think that anybody pointed out in this thread, and that I didn't notice myself until I was almost done the book, was our illustrious main character, Wade. \:D/ As in, wade through the water? I don't know if anybody else noticed that. Paul McCusker never ceases to amaze and amuse me!

Another person who amazes and amuses me is Trent, who switched from calling the main character Wade to calling him Kyle, a.k.a the boy in "Darien's Rise," during his review. :-

I love the continuing prologue and epilogue with Whit and Jack. Following that story is really interesting, especially since I don't remember how it turns out by the last book. :mad: The story was very nicely done with the retelling of the story of Noah, with lots of connections to history (all the WWII stuff etc.) which was interesting and educational. As a few people pointed out already, there was less to go on here than there was for the story of David, but Paul McCusker did a great job of developing a plausible storyline that sounded both realistic, Marus-like, and yet almost too familiar in the sense that it seems like it could happen in our world. Leaders sound good, people want to follow them, but then trouble ensues. Not everything is as it seems. Wade was easily deceived about who he should really trust and who actually had his (and everybody else's) best interests in mind. We all like to think that we're so discerning, but this serves as a reminder that arrogance and trusting our own power and strength leads to destruction.

I really appreciated the theme of undeserved salvation. In Wade's case, it was salvation from the destruction, but there was a strong parallel to the way that we are all so undeserving of eternal salvation. God freely offers us all the gift of grace, forgiveness, and salvation, but, like the people of Marus, that free gift is often mocked and rejected. And, just like judgement time finally came for the people Arin was preaching to, one day we will all be judged. On our own merit, we will all be found lacking. The difference depends on Who we are trusting in, and whether we choose to remain on the outside or accept the gift that we are all so undeserving off, but offered anyway. I loved the epilogue, with the reference to the newspaper article where Wade credited the Unseen One with bringing his father home. He accepted what was offered, and embraced it. Our own decisions are up to us.

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Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 1:42 pm 
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Great review, Catspaw!

Catspaw wrote:
Another person who amazes and amuses me is Trent, who switched from calling the main character Wade to calling him Kyle, a.k.a the boy in "Darien's Rise," during his review. :-

Whatever are you talking about? :noway:

O:)

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Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:38 pm 
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Trent DeWhite wrote:
Great review, Catspaw!

Catspaw wrote:
Another person who amazes and amuses me is Trent, who switched from calling the main character Wade to calling him Kyle, a.k.a the boy in "Darien's Rise," during his review. :-

Whatever are you talking about? :noway:

O:)

Nice edits, DeWhitester. ;) Hey, I compared you to Paul McCusker (kind of) - take it as a compliment! And I'm glad you liked my review. Yours was quite stellar as well! :D

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 Post Post subject: Re: Manuscript 2: Arin's Judgement
Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:04 am 
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Arin's Judgment was the very first Passages book I read, and, not knowing about the biblical parallel beforehand, I remember being captivated by the story and not realizing that it was a retelling of the story of Noah until somewhere in the last half of the book. Rereading it now, the clues seem so obvious: Arin's animal-laden shelter, the ostracization of his 8-person family, and the wickedness of this world that has turned its back on the Unseen One. Because this book made a deeper impression on me than any of the other Passages books, more of its plot has remained with me over the years.

This book is a much darker one than its predecessor; that's apparent even in the prologue, with Whit and Jack's finding the notebook ominously titled, "The Chronicle of the Destroyed." To say "I liked this book" seems inappropriate, given its staggering amount of corruption, depravity, and death. And yet it is a gripping story that paints a frighteningly realistic picture of a people given over to self. Or, as Arin said much more eloquently, "Once we have dispensed with Him [the Unseen One], we have dispensed with our true selves. So what's left? Men who commit heinous and immoral acts become heroes, giants in the land. Lives become expendable to wicked ideals and causes. We celebrate inhumanity because we no longer understand what it is to be human." It was fitting that those words returned to Wade during the chilling aftermath of Tyran's "experiment," and caused him to finally see their horrifying truth... to be roughly awakened to the immorality and inhumanity running rampant around him. It was this scene that I remembered most vividly from my first reading, and it was no less powerful this time. Another scene of that caliber was Tyran's speech, when Wade realized that the people en masse were just as depraved as Tyran. He also showed courage in his refusal to kneel, despite being vastly outnumbered. I wanted Dr. Lyst to find redemption, and was sad that he did not - especially since he came so close, and was conscious of Tyran's corruption when most others were not.

I was once again fascinated by the characteristics of the setting, especially this Marus being more advanced technologically than Marus-to-come (a la Darien's Rise). I'm also fascinated by the history of Marus, particularly learning more about Marus's relations with its neighboring countries over the years. I'm assuming that the epidemic was supposed to have spread to all the countries in the world of Passages (not just Marus)... though that makes me wonder how the other nations would be able to rebuild themselves after their populations are reduced to 0. Evidently Palatia, Gotthard, and the other nations exist here and in Darien's Rise. Just something to ponder.

On another note, Wade is a much more daring kid than I would've been in his situation. I wouldn't have ventured outside of the safety of Arin's compound the first time, and certainly not the second time. And Tyran and Dr. Lyst wouldn't have been too pleased to find out that I know nothing about bombs or warfare.

This book also vaguely reminded me of Ted Dekker's Circle trilogy, what with an epidemic being intricately connected to one person... though in quite the opposite way.

Wade had it much worse than Kyle and Anna. After all, knowing that you are responsible for wiping out an entire populace can't be an easy thing to swallow. The message of undeserved grace and forgiveness, of all of us being lost without Christ, came through strongly amidst the message of His judgment. I also enjoyed (again, that word seems out of place here) Wade's personal spiritual journey. A somber book, yet gripping and interesting on many levels.

4.5 stars.

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 Post Post subject: Re: Manuscript 2: Arin's Judgement
Posted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 3:53 pm 
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Like this one the best. Dariens Rise kind of bored me.

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